Rockwells mills

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4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Leeny
    Jan 03, 2011 @ 14:40:20

    Amazing History!

    Reply

  2. Jewell Hayes
    Jan 04, 2011 @ 14:53:09

    Glad you keep working at it. These are amazing pictures.

    Reply

  3. Bill
    Jan 18, 2011 @ 15:32:56

    OLD MILL

    Tourists passing and stopping for dinner at Ye-Old Mill on Route 8 near Mt. Upton little know that through two ancient wars men worked frantically in that building to fashion uniforms for the United States Army.
    Uniforms made in the Old Mill have been pierced with rebel bullets, have left the sharp pain of the Filipino sword and have been torn by the arrows of the Sioux Indians as Custer fought to the death at Little Big Horn.
    At one time over 200 men and women were employed there turning out goods that were even beyond the standard set by the Army. General Grant wore a uniform that was made there. The Rockwell uniforms clothed the regiments which fought and died at Bull Run, Harper’s Ferry, Gettysburg and other scenes of courage and death.
    After the war the mill made prison uniforms for many years.
    For forty years after the turn of the century the old mill was idle until it was made into a wonderful eating place called Ye-Old Mill.

    Reply

  4. Bill
    Jan 19, 2011 @ 09:57:34

    Rockwells and Latham Corners, less than 1 mile apart must be treated to some extent as one. The firs settlers were: Sullivan Reynolds, Robert McLeod, Lemuel Cornell, John Secor and James Hayes. all came in 1791Lemuel Cornell built his log house on the farm owned by Loren Wildenstein. Rockwells Mills was called “Union” until after 1850 when Urastus Rockwell bought the large mill. In 1869, with the coming of the railroad, a depot, freight house and loading platform was built on the land now owned by Richard Russ. About that time, Rockwells Mills had a woolen mill, Saw Mill, Store, Church, a Doctor, an Undertaker, a cooper and a cobbler.

    Reply

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